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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: In May of 2010, the committee staff noticed that the documents had been provided for the committee -- that had been provided for the committee's review were no longer accessible. Staff approached the C.I.A. personnel at the offsite location who initially denied the documents had been removed. C.I.A. personnel then blamed information technology personnel who were almost all contractors for removing the documents themselves without direction or authority. And then the C.I.A. stated that the removal of the documents was ordered by the White House. When the committee approached the White House, the White House denied giving the C.I.A. any such order.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: After a series of meetings, I learned that on two occasions, C.I.A. personnel electronically removed committee access to C.I.A. documents after providing them to the committee. This included roughly 870 documents or pages of documents that were removed in February 2010. And secondly, roughly another 50 that were removed in mid-may 2010 this was done without the knowledge or approval of committee members or staff and in violation of our written agreements.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: The matter was resolved with a renewed commitment from the White House counsel and the C.I.A. that there would be no further unauthorized access to the committee's network or removal of access to C.I.A. documents already provided to the committee. On May 17, 2010, The C.I.A.'s then-Director of Congressional Affairs apologized on behalf of the C.I.A. for removing the documents. and that, as far as I was concerned, put the incident aside.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: At some point in 2010, committee staff searching the documents that had been made available found draft versions of what is now called the internal Panetta Review. We believe these documents were written by C.I.A. personnel to summarize and analyze the materials that had been provided to the committee for its review. The Panetta review documents were no more highly classified than other information we had received for our investigation. In fact, the documents appeared based on the same information already provided to the committee.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: What was unique and interesting about the internal documents was not their classification level, but rather their analysis and acknowledgement of significant C.I.A. wrongdoing. To be clear, the committee staff did not hack into C.I.A. computers to obtain these documents, as has been suggested in the press. The documents were identified using the search tool provided by the C.I.A. to search the documents provided to the committee.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: We have no way to determine who made the internal Panetta Review documents available to the committee. Further, we don't know whether the documents were provided intentionally by the C.I.A., unintentionally by the C.I.A. or intentionally by a whistle-blower. In fact we know that over the years on multiple occasions the staff have asked the C.I.A. about documents made available for our investigation.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: At times the C.I.A. has simply been unaware that these specific documents were provided to the committee. And while this is alarming, it is also important to note that more than 6.2 million pages of documents have been provided. This is simply a massive amount of records. As I described earlier, as part of its standard process for reviewing records, the committee staff printed copies of the internal Panetta review and made electronic copies of the committee's computers at the facility. The staff did not rely on these internal Panetta review documents when drafting the final 6,300-page committee study.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: But it was significant that the internal Panetta Review had documented at least some of the very same troubling matters already uncovered by the committee staff, which is not surprising in that they were looking at the same information.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: The C.I.A. provided its response to the study on June 27, 2013. As C.I.A. Director Brennan has stated, the C.I.A. officially agrees with some of our study but has been reported the C.I.A. disagrees and disputes important parts of it, and this is important. Some of these important parts that the C.I.A. now disputes in our committee study are clearly acknowledged in the C.I.A.'s own internal Panetta Review. To say the least, this is puzzling. How can the C.I.A.'s official response to our study stand factually in conflict with its own internal review?
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: There are several reasons why the draft summary of the Panetta Review was brought to our secure spaces at the Hart building. Let me list them. One, the significance of the internal review given disparities between it and the June 2013 C.I.A. response to the committee study. The internal Panetta Review summary now at the secure committee office in Hart is an especially significant document as it corroborates critical information in the committee's 6,300-page study that the C.I.A.'s official response either objects to, denies, minimizes or ignores.
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